Skip navigation

3 Takeaways From #RTMBowl 2014

January, February, and March bring us some of the most exciting and heavily watched television events of the year.  

The Grammys, Oscars, and Golden Globes bring out the best of real time marketers (such as Arby’s tweet to Pharrell).  Probably the most anticipated event in sports and marketing is, of course, the Super Bowl.  

It is the most watched and most tweeted event on television and real time marketers did not pass up the opportunity to try and win the RTMBowl.

(This is a hashtag for Real-Time Marketing Bowl.) 

I noticed my feeds were slow during the game itself but when the commercial breaks aired I was flooded with brand and marketer commentary.  

This year seemed to take a slightly different approach than previous years and this is what we learned:

  • Brands playing off other brands makes for funny banter but it does not create consumer engagement or a call to action. Second screens are used to continue the conversation about a product after the commercial has aired.  

    There are a lot of bad examples (see next paragraph) however there were two excellent examples from Sunday’s ads. U2 and Bank of America’s Red ad was compelling and impactful, and Esurance’s was humorous.  Both had clear social calls to action and encouraged engagement beyond the 30 second commercial.
     
  • Gimmicks aren’t real time marketing. J.C. Penney wore mittens but everyone thought they were drunk.  This sparked some hilarious, albeit B2B style, marketing with Snickers, Kia, and various others.  

    Because of the nature of a fast moving news feed, almost no one figured out the mittens reference until later in the evening.  When it came down to it this was not real time marketing; their tweet had nothing to do with anything in the moment of the game or ads on the screen.  
     

  • Make sure your hashtag is written in the right format.


    I'm looking at you, Budweiser. This may be a little bit of marketing 101 but this is a big deal if you are trying to create a conversation online.  #SaluteAHero was receiving tweets with just #Salute, a big rookie mistake.

    #HashtagsAreAllOneWord, Bud.


Real time marketing content cannot be forced. It must be organic and exciting. Unfortunately the game was not exciting enough to generate much interesting content (unless you count Joe Namath’s coat), but brands may have had better luck engaging with their customers rather than each other.

What were your takeaways from real time marketing and the Super Bowl?

Melissa Kerwin is a social media analyst specializing in social media advertising for sports and entertainment clients. Tweet her at @melissa_kerwin.

 

Chapters
United States
Argentina
Australia
Austria
Bahrain
Belgium
Brazil
Cambodia
Canada
China
Costa Rica
Czech Republic
Denmark
Dominican Republic
Ecuador
El Salvador
France
Germany
Global
Greece
Iceland
India
Indonesia
Ireland
Isle of Man
Israel
Italy
Japan
Jordan
Kazakhstan
Kenya
Kuwait
Malaysia
Mexico
Moldova
Mongolia
Morocco
Netherlands
New Zealand
Nigeria
Oman
Panama
Paraguay
Peru
Portugal
Qatar
Russia
Saudi Arabia
Singapore
South Africa
South Korea
Spain
Sri Lanka
Sweden
Switzerland
Tunisia
Turkey
Ukraine
United Arab Emirates
United Kingdom